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C++ Book Converts C# Developers

You want to build a Windows 8 app. Microsoft says C++ is the way, but you’re a C# developer. Maybe you remember C++, have a history with it, and will only need a brief reacquaintance. Maybe you’ve never known C++, never even courted it, and hope since it’s in the family of C that your jump to it won’t end with a thud.

Either way, you’re okay.

Take comfort knowing Michael McLaughlin’s expertise and expansive C++ knowledge are in his latest book, C++ Succinctly. As part of Syncfusion’s Succinctly series, this free e-book saves you from scouring C++11 language specifications and various other online resources.

Setting the two languages side-by-side, McLaughlin points to the similarities that will make your transition easier while issuing dire warnings regarding the differences that will cause you trouble. It certainly is not a beginner’s introduction to C++, but if you’ve worked with C# professionally, you’ll benefit from McLaughlin’s insight.

Glancing at the table of contents quickly gives you an idea of the topics covered:

· Chapter 1 – Types

· Chapter 2 – Namespaces

· Chapter 3 – Functions and Classes

· Chapter 4 – Storage Duration

· Chapter 5 – Constructors, Destructors, and Operators

· Chapter 6 – Resource Acquisition Is Initialization

· Chapter 7 – Pointers, References, and Const-Correctness

· Chapter 8 – Casting in C++

· Chapter 9 – Strings

· Chapter 10 – C++ Language Usages and Idioms

· Chapter 11 – Templates

· Chapter 12 – Lambda Expressions

· Chapter 13 – C++ Standard Library

· Chapter 14 – Visual Studio and C++

Despite the breadth of the subject matter, which may seem daunting, the book doesn’t exceed 125 pages. Each chapter starts with a concise overview of the subject, and proceeds to the essence of working with C++.

As a Windows developer, know that your transition to C++ is coming. C++ Succinctly quickly provides a handle on this complex language. Although this book won’t instantly make you an expert, it will launch you on your way, more so than if you don’t read it.

C++ Succinctly by Michael McLaughlin can be found with the entire Succinctly series at Syncfusion’s Technology Resource Portal. Upcoming topics include F# and knockout.js.

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