Objective-C Succinctly: The Painless Approach to Objective-C

For most .NET developers, learning Objective-C is probably near the bottom of their to-do list. For one thing, it's not C# or VB.NET. It's outside of their comfort zone. The syntax alone is enough to elicit groans from a developer or two. But most importantly, what's stopping many .NET developers from diving into Objective-C is the constant problem of finding time to sit down and learn a new programming language.

With Syncfusion's newest e-book, Objective-C Succinctly, you can learn the essentials of Objective-C in a matter of hours. Author Ryan Hodson, who contributed popular Knockout.js and PDF titles to the Succinctly series, clearly explains what you need to know, from setting up the Xcode IDE to advanced language features such as blocks and protocols. Throughout the book are diagrams, code samples, and screenshots to save you from getting snagged on any tough concepts. Hodson carefully explains how the familiar aspects of object-oriented programming, such as interfaces, classes, methods, and more are used in Objective-C. He also takes time to compare Objective-C features with their C and C# counterparts, allowing you to leverage what you already know with the tools presented in the book. Hodson even devotes an entire chapter of the book to handling errors and exceptions so your end users can run your program without a glitch, and so you won't be left staring blankly at a compile error, dumbfounded about what went wrong.

Now more than ever, developers can no longer write code only in the languages they're most comfortable with. Considering the accelerating shift to mobile development and the necessity for cross-platform apps and tools, developers must expand their knowledge base to handle any development platform on any device. With Objective-C Succinctly, you can begin your Mac and iOS development faster than writing Hello World! in Python.

Comments (1) -

  • Jason
    Dec 8, 2012

    Excellent!   Very helpful for C# developers to translate the difference between C# and Objective-C.   When do you plan on releasing the iOS book?

Loading